April Writing Show: Coloring Between the Lines: Using What You Know and Where You’re From in Fiction

“Write about what you don’t know about what you know,” instructed Eudora Welty. But how exactly do you dig deep into the familiar to create an extraordinary experience for your readers?

Veteran novelists and professors—and husband and wife—Carrie Brown and John Gregory Brown talk about mining your own geographical and personal history as writers, as well as tools and techniques for finding out more about what you already think you know about your place—or places—in the world.  

Virginia Pye, author of River of Dust, will moderate the discussion about anchoring your writing through environment and experience. The second half of the panel welcomes questions from the audience.

Coloring Between the Lines: Using What You Know and Where You’re From in Fiction
Thursday, April 24, 2014
6:30-8:30 p.m., with complimentary hors d’oeuvres
The Broadberry (note the new location we’re trying out for April’s show!)
2729 W. Broad Street
Ample parking available in the Children’s Museum parking lot across the street, on street, and in the lot adjacent to the Broadberry

$10 in advance, $12 at the door, $5 students

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January Writing Show – Great Expectations: The Realities of Self-publishing

Doing it yourself can bring big rewards and big challenges. Navigating both writing and publishing your book can be tricky, especially if you don’t know what to expect. Learn from the experiences of self-published authors as they discuss what worked and what didn’t, including a realistic look at expectations.

The latest in James River Writer’s Writing Show series, Great Expectations: The Realities of Self-publishing, on Thursday, January 30, at the Camel, features three self-published authors.

David Kazzie’s debut novel, The Jackpot, has sold more than 11,000 copies since last January and spent nine days on Amazon’s Top 100 Kindle Bestseller List, peaking at No. 34. Rosemary Rawlins is the author of a memoir, Learning by Accident, which will be released in March. Leila Gaskin is the author of Hot Flashes and several short stories. Bill Blume, author of Tales of a 10th Grade Vampire Hunter, will moderate. The second half of the panel will welcome questions from the audience.

Thursday, January 30, 2014
6:30-8:30 p.m.
The Camel
1621 W. Broad St., Richmond
Ample parking available in the Lowe’s parking lot across the street (Lowe’s and the Camel have a parking sharing agreement).

$10 in advance, $12 at the door, $5 students, or $80 Writing Show Season Pass (9 shows)

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Buy your season pass to the 2014 Writing Shows

James River Writers is pleased to offer a season pass to the 2014 Writing Shows. For a one-time purchase of $80, you are guaranteed admission into all nine Writing Show in 2014 (tickets are $12 at the door, $10 in advance). Click on the below image to buy your pass today.
 

Season Pass Ticket
 

Held on the last Thursday of every month from January through September at the Camel (1621 W. Broad St.), The Writing Show brings together published authors and other literary professionals to offer an insider’s look at the craft and business of writing. (more…)

JRW’s September Writing Show Recap: Unearthing the true story of the Hatfields and McCoys feud

Moonshine—when not inspiring fist-fights and gunshots—can loosen a good story.

On Thursday, September 26, 2013, a jug of the notorious libation found its way from hand to hand on the stage of the Camel in Richmond, VA. Taking sips and swapping tales were Dean King, local bestselling author of The Feud: The Hatfields and McCoys: The True Story; Geoff Shandler, King’s editor from Little, Brown and Company in New York City, and Darrell Fetty, Hollywood producer of the Emmy and Golden Globe-winning mini-series, The Hatfields & McCoys. “Warring Words, Endless Possibilities: The Hatfields & McCoys from Bookstore to Reality TV” was the last Writing Show of James River Writers’ 2013 season, and it was indeed a show-stopper.

King described his years of original research, including documents and interviews with relatives of both families. He unearthed anecdotes that shed new light and brought vivid detail to the tangled saga. (more…)

August Writing Show:
Interviewing Skills: Crime and Punishment Style

The Writing Show

Thursday, August 29, 2013

Description

What do writers get wrong about the justice system from the street cop to solving the case? And how can a writer research for books in the crime and thriller genre?

No matter what you write–memoir, fiction, or non fiction–chances are you will need to interview someone to fill in the gaps in your research. (more…)

July Writing Show: Hearts and Minds: Exploring YA Fiction at the Source

The Writing Show

Thursday, July 25, 2013

Recap

Pencil by Sheri Blume

Description

Is YA your genre of choice, or are you considering it? One of the hottest markets in publishing, young adult fiction has specific challenges. What makes good YA and how is it different than adult fiction? Who better to ask than the target audience themselves—and an author and librarian who have successfully reached young adult readers?

James River Writer’s Writing Show for July 2013, Hearts and Minds: Exploring YA Fiction at the Source featured children’s librarian Lucinda Whitehurst and Lana Krumwiede, author of Freakling. Moderator Valley Haggard, founder of Richmond Young Writers, guided the discussion about what works, what doesn’t, and the trends and whether you should follow them.

The second half of the program highlighted a panel of teens, including some of JRW’s Youth Advisory Board members. Chico Payne, Cassie Womack, and Madeleine Jordon-Lord. The students talked about their pet peeves and what their favorite authors get right. Annesha Sengupta and Gbari Garrett read a few excerpts from their own work. The program concluded with questions from the audience.

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A Writer’s Platform – Marketing at Every Stage of Your Career

The Writing Show

Thursday, May 30, 2013

Recap

Pencil by Jennifer Drummond

Description

Who are you as a writer? Whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned author, how do you build your brand and your following? Being a writer today means more than just writing. Learning and implementing marketing strategies at every chapter of your journey is essential for success.

A Writer’s Platform – Marketing at Every Stage of Your Career, offered unique perspectives from three authors—Karen Chase, Deb Dudley, and Meg Medina—each in a different phase of their literary paths. Julie Geen, a freelance writer and teacher, moderated the discussion, which included how to prioritize and budget tasks and how to shape an identity as a writer.
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River of Dust: The Gritty Truth About Editing

The Writing Show

Thursday, May 30, 2013

Recap

Pencil by Kevin Yuan

Description

Have you reached the point when you can’t look at your manuscript a moment longer? It may be time for a fresh pair of eyes—and not just anyone’s. But what does working with a professional editor entail, and how will you feel about the result?

The latest in James River Writer’s Writing Show series delves deep into the editing process that resulted in the publication of Virginia Pye’s debut novel. River of Dustselected as an Indie Next Pick and to be released on May 14, has been hailed by Annie Dillard as “terrific, tremendous, wonderful…a strong, beautiful, deep book.”

Pye, local to Richmond, and her editor, visiting award-winning author Nancy Zafris, a manuscript consultant and series editor for the Flannery O’Connor award for short fiction, will share the details of their successful collaboration. Patty Smith, a short fiction and nonfiction writer and teacher, will moderate the discussion about what had to change and Pye’s 20-year writing journey.

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The Writer Whisperer:
Therapeutic Advice for All Manner of Writerly Woes

The Writing Show

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Recap

Pencil by Kathleen Sams Flippen

Description

Are you exhausted by your own mind? Struggling with writer’s block? Dejected by rejection? Do you need encouragement and solutions? Learn from writers who have been there and come out the other side. Join us for this month’s Writing Show for a healthy dose of inspiration on how to cope, from storming through that first draft to facing the publication process.
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Killing Your Darlings: How to Handle Violence in Your Stories

The Writing Show

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Recap

Pencil by Sheila Sheppard Lovelady

Description

When it comes to showing violence in your story, how much is too much? Whether you’re writing about a soldier on the battlefield or a shooting at a school, there’s a fine line between showing your reader what’s happening and being insensitive to those who suffer these experiences in the real world. At this month’s Writing Show, we’ll show you how to keep your story exciting without resorting to exploitation.
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